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Essay on Transsexualism

This is a free sample essay on Transsexualism:
In 1952, few Americans were familiar with the concept of transsexualism. It was difficult to understand or acknowledge that “gender” was not synonymous with “sex;” that is, most people believed that the anatomy with which a child was born would indisputably influence his or her behavior, disposition, career choices, tastes and sexual preferences in one of two ways: male, or female. It was in that year that Christine Jorgensen was born.

Christine Jorgensen was in fact a pseudonym for a 26 year old ex-GI from the Bronx named George. Since childhood Jorgensen had been haunted by his place in the sexual binary system, pulled like a magnet to a female identity despite his male genitals. He had finally decided to seek sex-reassignment surgery, an operation that was not available in America but was crudely performed by some doctors in Denmark (Brown et. al). Eventually details of Jorgensen’s surgery were leaked to reporters and the Daily News screamed “EX-GI BECOMES BLONDE BOMBSHELL” one quiet morning in December, propelling America into a frenzy of shock, outrage, and curiosity. Some people even saw the fact and publicity of such an event as an important landmark in the destruction of all moral and societal “good.” What most Americans and other Western citizens didn’t know was that a rich history of transsexualism, transgenderism and/or gender variation had been alive and celebrated in many Non-Western societies for innumerable years. The Two-Spirited people of the various American Indian tribes and pre-contact south- and central-Americans are arguably the most interesting example of unique transgenderal customs, beliefs, and societal significance.

Mar 24, 2011

Essay on Socialization

This is a free example essay on Socialization:
Nature versus nurture:
According to one side of the debate, individuals and social behavior are a product of heredity or nature. The others say that individual and social behavior are a product of experience and learning or nurture. Darwin pushed the nature viewpoint in his theory of evolution. “Humans are a product of natural processes”, he said. Evolutionary theorist used his theory to explain cross cultural differences and social inequalities. According to this, the dominant positions the Europeans occupied in the world was a result of natural selection – Asian, African and other people were regarded as biologically inferior. Within a group, people were believed to be rich and poor due to “survival of the fittest”. The concept of survival of the fittest was used to justify genocide.

In the 20th century the pendulum swayed toward “nurture”. Pavlov experimented to show that dogs could be taught to salivate even at the sound of a bell, Skinner showed that pigeons could be taught ping-pong. The experiments were done through “reward” and “punishment”. These social scientists argued that human mind is equally malleable. It was believed that human mind is tabula rasa, upon which experience writes.

Feb 25, 2011

Workplace and Drug Abuse Essay

This is a free example essay on Workplace and Drug Abuse:
Drug abuse has been an ongoing problem that has plagued America. The ramped use of illegal drugs impacts our society in many ways. Drug abuse attributes to increases in violent crime, poverty, domestic violence, HIV, school drop out rate, homelessness, teen pregnancy, and increasing health costs due to health related problems.

Since the beginning of the 19th century America has had a problem with drug abuse. During this time, morphine, cocaine, and heroin, were commonly used like aspirin is today. By the time the twentieth century cam along our nation was dealing with its first problem of increasing drug use. The use of opium became ramped in the United States as well. Eventually the government began to recognize the problem and put laws in place to regulate drug use (Carroll, 2002). By the time of World War II was in existence, drug abuse had basically come to a halt, and was not an issue as it was previously.

That all changed with the onset of the 1960’s. Marijuana and psychedelics were popular in the 1960’s and was more widely accepted. Because of this newly, wide spread use, the government began to create federal agencies to aggressively enforce the federal laws that were in existence. These laws were put in place to regulate illegal drug use. Soon after the 1970’s were here and so was cocaine. During the 1970’s cocaine use was considered the drug of choice, it also brought along with it a new surge of violent crimes and increased addiction.

Nov 1, 2010
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